DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS COMMITTEE

Wednesday, February 14, 2018 - 9:30 AM

 

 

Gerald Morrow, Chairperson

Roby Politi, Vice-Chairperson

 

 

Chairman Morrow called this DPW Committee Meeting to order at 9:30 a.m. with the following supervisors in attendance: Robin DeLoria, Archie Depo, Shaun Gillilland, Joseph Giordano, Ron Jackson, Michael Marnell, Stephen McNally, Noel Merrihew, Dean Montroy, James Monty, Ronald Moore, Gerald Morrow, Michael Tyler and Joe Pete Wilson. Charles Harrington, Roby Politi, Randy Preston, and Thomas Scozzafava, had been previously excused.

 

Department heads present were:Daniel Palmer, and Judy Garrison.Chris Garrow and Dan Manning were absent

 

Deputies present:Jim Dougan

 

Also present: Dave Reckahn - Soil and Water

 

News Media present:Ketih Lobdell Ė Sun News.

 

MORROW:Call the Department of Public Works to order, everybody stand for the pledge, please.

Good morning everyone, come on right up Jim. So, you want to start right off, you got some resolutions here.

 

DOUGAN: Yup, I have a number of resolutions. The first one would be to renew an agreement with New York State DOT. This is the snow and ice removal agreement. Itís a five year contract, itís just a renewal, so if I could get authorization for the County Chairman or County Manager to sign that.

 

MORROW: Moved by Mr. Moore.

 

RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING THE CHAIRMAN OR THE COUNTY MANAGER TO EXECUTE AN AGREEMENT WITH THE NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FOR SNOW AND ICE CONTROL SERVICES, AS NEEDED, FOR THE PERIOD OF JULY 1, 2017 TO JUNE 30, 2022.

Moved by Mr. Moore, seconded by Mr. DeLoria

 

MORROW: Seconded by Mr. DeLoria. Any discussion on that resolution?

 

MCNALLY: Is this the same contract that they pay two year prices for the salt and all that?

 

DOUGAN: No, itís a different contract, actually.

 

MCNALLY: Whatís this contract based on?

 

DOUGAN: This one is just for our labor, when we clean up out front here, all that snow and ice. This doesnít even have them do any work for us, this is only having us available to do work, if they need us to.

 

MCNALLY: Alright, thank you.

 

MORROW: Any other questions? If not, all in favor? Opposed? Resolution carries. Next one, Jim

 

DOUGAN: I am looking for a resolution for a change order with Clune Electric regarding the Nutrition Building. Thereís two items involved, one is the main electrical service. The original drawings show a primary power coming from 9 and 22 with a transformer on site, right next to the building. National Grid wanted to change that from what was bid to a secondary service where we put the transformer on the pole and that make the electrician responsible for the wire all the way into the site and thereís also a change in the meter panel that National Grid wanted. So, thatís one, that charge is $12,513.00 and the second change would be to add a 400 amp manual transfer switch, so that if we wanted to have an emergency generator for that building in the future, itís all ready to do that. So, the total resolution would be for $23,454.00 for a change order.

 

MORROW: Moved by Mr. Depo

 

RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING A CHANGE ORDER TO HAROLD R. CLUNE, INC., IN THE AMOUNT OF $23,454.00 FOR ELECTRICAL CHANGES AT THE NUTRITION BUILDING, INCLUDING THE ADDITION OF A 400 AMP MANUAL TRANSFER SWITCH AND MAIN SERVICE ENTRY CHANGES AS REQUIRED BY NATIONAL GRID WITH FUNDS TO COME FROM BUDGETED FUNDS, AND FURTHER AUTHORIZING THE COUNTY CHAIRMAN OR COUNTY MANAGER TO EXECUTE SAID CHANGE ORDER.

Moved by Mr. Depo, seconded by Mr. Monty

 

MORROW: Do we have a second? Mr. Monty. Further discussion or questions?

 

MARNELL: Yeah, weíre going to need a generator for that building anyways, so wouldnít you do it all at the same time?

 

PALMER: Well, actually, there is a, you have to take this with a grain of salt; okay? Town of Moriah has a generator. How many amp is that generator?

 

DOUGAN: Itís 75kw

 

PALMER: Itís a 75kw, itís almost brand new. It was from the Village. It looks and is in really good shape, but we obviously have to test it and do all that. Tommyís indicated that heís willing to let us have it for next to nothing, whatever that means from Tommy, Iím not really sure, but when we looked at this and we looked at doing these changes that would facilitate the ability to use that, possibly at some point.

 

MORROW: Good question, anybody else? If not, all in favor? Opposed? Resolution carries

 

DOUGAN: The third resolution would be to authorize the Purchasing Agent to award a contract to Adirondack Concrete, LLC, for the amount of $908,000.00 for the Fraternaland Road Bridge replacement in the Town of Schroon.

 

MORROW: Moved by Mr. Moore.

 

RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING THE PURCHASING AGENT TO AWARD A CONTRACT TO ADIRONDACK CONCRETE, LLC IN THE AMOUNT OF $908,000.00 FOR GENERAL CONSTRUCTION OF THE FRATERNALAND ROAD BRIDGE REPLACEMENT PROJECT IN THE TOWN OF SCHROON WITH FUNDS TO COME FROM THE BRIDGE BOND AND FURTHER AUTHORIZING THE COUNTY CHAIRMAN OR COUNTY MANAGER TO EXECUTE SAID CONTRACT AMENDMENT.

Moved by Mr. Moore, seconded by Mr. Marnell

 

MORROW: Discussion or comments? If not all in favor, opposed, carries.

 

DOUGAN: Number four is another bridge, itís a resolution allowing the Purchasing Agent to award a contract to Reale Construction Company in the amount of $264,000.00 for the rehabilitation and of the Oregon Plains Road Bridge in St. Armand.

 

MORROW: A motion on that? Moved by Mr. Marnell, seconded by Mr. Moore

 

RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING THE PURCHASING AGENT TO AWARD A CONTRACT TO REALE CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC, IN THE AMOUNT OF $264,000.00 FOR GENERAL CONSTRUCTION OF THE OREGON PLAINS ROAD BRIDGE REHABILITATION PROJECT IN THE TOWN OF ST. ARMAND WITH FUNDS TO COME FROM THE BRIDGE BOND AND FURTHER AUTHORIZING THE COUNTY CHAIRMAN OR COUNTY MANAGER TO EXECUTE THE SAID CONTRACT.

Moved by Mr. Marnell, seconded by Mr. Moore

 

MORROW: Discussion or comments? If not, all in favor? Opposed? Carries

 

DOUGAN: Number five is a resolution authorizing the Purchasing Agent to award a contract to Alltech Integrations in the amount of $8,296.54. Thatís for the fire alarm monitoring system at that Nutrition Building. That is for the equipment and materials and startup, weíre going to have our Buildings and Grounds people run all interioring cable to try and keep the cost down some.

 

MORROW: We have a motion from Mr. Monty. Do we have a second on this? Mr. DeLoria

 

RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING THE PURCHASING AGENT TO AWARD A CONTRACT TO ALLTECH INTEGRATIONS IN THE AMOUNT OF $8,296.54 FOR THE INSTALLATION OF A FIRE ALARM SYSTEM AT THE NUTRITION BUILDING WITH FUNDS TO COME FROM BUDGETED FUNDS, AND FURTHER AUTHORIZING THE COUNTY CHAIRMAN OR THE COUNTY MANAGER TO EXECUTE SAID CONTRACT.

Moved by Mr. Monty, seconded by Mr. DeLoria

 

MORROW: Any discussion or comments? If not, all in favor? Opposed? Resolution carries.

Do you have any more resolutions?

 

DOUGAN: I do have one more, Jerry.

 

MORROW: Okay, no problem.

 

DOUGAN: Itís authorizing a contract amendment with Schoder River Associates, in the amount not to exceed $18,100.00 for a full topographic and boundary survey of the entire Fish Hatchery property, with the funds to come from the Northern Borders Grant. A little bit of background, with the Town of Crown Point, their water system is immediate adjacent and we received a grant a couple of years ago for a shared building between Crown Point and Essex County where Crown Pointís water system is going to be, their chlorine system is going to be in the building and so is the Fish Hatchery office and bathrooms. We need to topo in part to finalize our easement between the Town of Crown Point and Essex County and then as we identified a few years ago, the big concerns at the Fish Hatchery were water supply, so weíre going to, after we have the topographic survey, weíre going to design where weíre collecting a lot of the springs in spring boxes, so that weíre not so impacted by tannings, the duff layer, some of the debris that gets into the system and weíre collecting it at a little bit lower elevation and itís protected from the leaves in the spring and a lot of ice up. So, thatís what that $18,000.00 survey is going to be all about.

 

MORROW: Somebody what to move that for discussion? Moved by Mr. Moore. Do I have a second on it? Mr. Monty.

 

RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING A CONTRACT AMENDMENT WITH SCHODER RIVER ASSOCIATES, IN AN AMOUNT NOT-TO-EXCEED $18,100.00 FOR TOPOGRAPHIC AND BOUNDARY SURVEY OF THE FISH HATCHERY PROPERTY, WITH FUNDS TO COME FROM THE NORTHERN BORDERS GRANT, AND FURTHER AUTHORIZING THE COUNTY CHAIRMAN OR COUNTY MANAGER TO EXECUTE SAID CONTRACT AMENDMENT.

Moved by Mr. Moore, seconded by Mr. Monty.

 

MORROW: Discussion? If not, all in favor? Opposed? Resolution carries.

Any more resolutions, Jim?

 

DOUGAN: I donít have any more resolutions, no.

 

MORROW: Okay, everybody get the report? You can go down through them one at time, see if thereís any questions?

Any questions on the Highway Division? Buildings and Grounds? Janitors? Okay, Public Safety Building?

 

MARNELL: Not, safety, very minor, but again, I ask if we can get a new floor in this little restroom and a toilet thatís maybe handicapped accessible or 18 inch to eliminate the drips on the floor every time you go in there and those tiles are separated. So, it makes it hard on the janitors to keep that room clean. Itís a very minor item, but I think the janitors would appreciate it and Iím sure anyone that has to use it would appreciate it, too.

 

MORROW: Theyíll look into it, Mr. Marnell.

Anything on the engineers? Fish Hatchery, we just had Fish Hatchery, questions on that?

 

MONTY: Fish Hatchery, going back to the designing committee, I know a month or so ago we discussed that bridge in Minerva, I believe Mr. McNally was going to contact the owner, the property that has holding this up. You had the opportunity, Steve, to talk to him?

 

MCNALLY: I have not spoke to him. I know thatÖ

 

DOUGAN: Bob LeVeille, from my office, was corresponding was him and then a couple of months ago I noticed the Board that we were kind of getting to an impasse, where it doesnít seem like weíre going to be able to work with this person. Heís really looking for money for a temporary easement. I did mention to the Board that I was going to ask the Attorney to send a letter to this landowner, kind of letting him know that weíre at the last stage before I recommend to this Board eminent domain proceedings. Thatís really where Iím at right now, I would really like to peruse that, eminent domain. Thereís two bridges on Trout Brook Road that one was replaced this past year, there were three landowners that worked with us, that provided us temporary easements to do the work. On this particular location, the same thing, there are three landowners, two of the three have agreed to work with us for temporary easements and I think that it would be a disservice to those five landowners in that Town and on that road alone who have given us temporary easements without taking any dollars to pay this gentleman, heís actually impacted less than one of the other two people who have already given us a temporary easement. So, youíve brought that up. I was going to request that at the end of the meeting, if this Board would recommend that Mr. Manning start that procedure.

 

MONTY: Iíll make the motion, because this has dragged on for over a year now that weíve been trying to do this. I mean the initial thought process was we would bid both bridges at the same time to save money, to have roads taken out of service for extended periods. Frankly, Iíll make the motion now to have Mr. Manning start eminent domain proceedings.

 

MORROW: So, we have a motion on the floor by Mr. Monty for Mr. Manning to start eminent domain. Do we have a second? Mr. DeLoria.

 

RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING THE COUNTY ATTORNEY TO ACQUIRE A PIECE OF PROPERTY IN THE TOWN OF MINERVA THROUGH THE POWER OF EMINENT DOMAIN.

Moved by Mr. Monty, seconded by Mr. DeLoria

 

MORROW: Under discussion or questions? I have been working closely with Jim and Chris on this also, and I am most of the time, totally against eminent domain, but in this case, you canít be held hostage, either. And it is just somebody that is not wanting to negotiate or anything, so you have to fight fire with fire.

 

MONTY: We have given him ample opportunity too.

 

MORROW: Many, many times and this is it, so I support, too. Any other discussion? All in favor? Opposed? Carries. Thank you for bringing that up, Jim.

Does anybody have anything under miscellaneous or anything else on DPW agenda?

 

JACKSON: Just a question my Town Board asked me to bring up. I know we did a new contract with Serkil, not too long ago, and the reason is obvious, because theyíre so much cheaper than Casella, but a lot of residents in my Town feel that we should be recycling more plastics and stuff than what we do. Is there any reason? I mean we have to do the sorting at the transfer site, why we canít sort into additional boxes for additional plastics. I am just curious to what the roadblock is to doing that. I donít see why there should be one?

 

MORROW: Okay

 

DOUGAN: Iíll make the request. The way the contract is setup with Serkil, theyíre responsible to pick up the recyclables. They deal with the recyclables. We donít receive any credit, if they get credit, we donít receive a bill if what they get for reimbursement goes down, but I can definitely make that request and report back to you and see if thereís a reason why.

 

JACKSON: Maybe if we spoke to them and just see, they might be willing to. Itís a shame, A) that weíre throwing it away, B) that weíre paying to haul it to Franklin County and bury it. So, not only arenít we recycling it, itís costing us money and costing our people money that could be avoided with a little more options on there.

 

MORROW: We do have meetings with Serkil quite often, so weíll bring that up.

 

JACKSON: I would appreciate that.

 

MORROW: Youíre welcome.

 

JACKSON: Thank you very much.

 

MORROW: No problem, thank you very much.

 

MONTY: Ron, Iíve had the same questions from a lot of residents in Lewis as well and Iíve addressed it to Mr. Maye, up there and the bottom line is thereís no money in other plastics, so theyíre not going to do it. Thatís what I was told.

 

MORROW: But, thatís not the last word, either.

 

MONTY: Understood.

 

MORROW: Yup, Mr. Maye does not have the last word.

 

MONTY: Right, but thatís the excuse.

 

JACKSON: That is kind of what I suspected, but, like I as I say, Casella is a lot of more money and all of that, but they certainly recycle more stuff.

 

DELORIA: Yeah, we put on our agenda in Newcomb a comprehensive review of recycling in town and I canít say that Iím one of the best recyclers at times, you know it misses the box and goes into the bag, but we also know that we if can reduce the tonnage that goes out, weíre technically saving, you know money on the whole. So, thatís something that weíre going to do as a town level and to go along with what Ronís saying, if weíre limited on what we can recycle, it somewhat ties our hands to paying the tonnage to get of this, but certainly with the glass, we know that if we can, you know buckle down on that type of stuff, that we can probably save some tonnage. So, weíre going to do it locally and see where it all goes, itís necessary.

 

MORROW: Yup, very good. Anybody else?

Do you have anything else, Jim?

 

DOUGAN: Yeah, two other items. Itís early yet, but probably time to discuss household hazard waste days, again. I would like to get on that vendorís schedule, sooner rather than later. Last year we added a 4th location and we added it and they did get that 4th location in, but it ended up taking place on Labor Day weekend. I donít know if thatís a good thing or a bad thing to get people on Labor Day weekend to go out and deal with household hazard waste, so I just want to get on the schedule soon. So, I guess my question to the Board, are you wanting 4 locations again, are you wanting the same 4 locations?

 

TYLER: I guess my first question would be, how did that 4th location do?

 

DOUGAN: The one that we added last year was the Mineville or the Moriah location. Based on dollars; which is direct correlation to volume, North Elba was the highest amount. The one at our Essex County DPW was second, the third highest was the one in Moriah and then the lowest one was the one in North Hudson.

 

TYLER: Well, Tommyís not here, so it would be a good time to do away with it.

 

MORROW: Yeah, I was going to say, it that a motion?

 

TYLER: Iím not on the Committee.

 

MORROW: I know that, I was looking and youíre not.

Does that answer your question?

 

TYLER: Yes, it does.

 

MARNELL: Do we have a decrease every year in quantities of hazardous waste? We should be going down. I mean when you have it the first time and people cleaning their basements and this and that, but does Clinton County, do they have a hazardous waste day?

 

DOUGAN: They do. I donít know what their results are. The dollar amount that we spend every year has gone up, since Iíve been here.

 

MARNELL: It should be going to the other way.

 

DOUGAN: Our first year, my first year here was around $45,000.00, the next year it was $66,000.00 that we spent this past year with the 4th location it was $69,000.00.

 

MARNELL: They must be bringing to from second homes from downstate, out of state. otherwise, I mean youíve got your homeowner, they clean up and unless they keep buying hazardous, because you buy it, you usually use it and they have a little less, but I think I would go back to three sites.

 

DOUGAN: We do apply for every year and get 50% of it reimbursed through a grant, just so everybody is aware of what it costs us.

 

TYLER: Well, sometimes, like we do in Westport, we have a cleanup day and we changed it, sometimes, about every other year, weíll pick up, like refrigerators and things like that, because if we do it every year we donít have as much, maybe to think about skipping a year.

 

MONTY: Well, I was thinking that a lot of our area we have a lot of contractors that do painting and stuff and a lot of that material, because we donít tell contractors that they canít come in and drop it off, so I think what weíre finding is a lot of these contractors are keeping their paint that is leftover and materials throughout the course of the year and then bringing them at that date; which would really, to me, would be the reason why weíre staying about even or going up. I think we should keep doing it every year and we only increased $3,000.00, so really that was $1,500.00, because we got reimbursed for Ĺ of it, to keep that material from being besides the roads and in a stream, I think itís a good service that weíre providing to our constituents and I would like to see us continue to move forward doing it and it does appear that it is working, because obviously it is increasing. So, my thought is we continue to do it and really 4 locations for $1,500.00.

 

MCNALLY: Yeah, I brought this up before, it goes along with waste, the tire program that Mr. Reckahn set up to get rid of tires was very successful last year and I was just seeing if there was any way that we could do something with the e-waste. Right now, currently I know that there are a lot of towns are paying .35Ę a pound to get rid of e-waste and also a lot of towns are taking their e-waste to Plattsburgh. I contacted the gentleman in Plattsburgh, he plans on not offering the service much longer and e-waste is becoming very difficult for the County to get rid of and I think thereís a need for e-waste as much as hazardous waste and maybe we can even do it on a one, one year and one the next or something like that, but e-waste is a big concern of mine.

 

MORROW: Okay

 

GILLILLAND: Yeah I think, I agree with Mr. Monty, the point is, yeah itís growing, that means that the stuff is not ending up in ditches or in the woods. You know having done town wide clean up and things and pulling some of this stuff out of the sides of the roads and things, because if we donít offer that, that is where eventually where some of it is going to end up. So, if itís not convenient and affordable to get rid of it. The tires are the next big thing, that barely hits it. I know the farms have gone out and new farms have gone and started plowing the fields and tires are popping out of the ground and things like that. Weíve got a terrible problem and I am sure that there are a lot of computers and printers out in the woods right now, too.

 

MCNALLY: It is getting very difficult to get rid of them.

 

MORROW: It is

 

MERRIHEW: I am just in support that I believe we should continue this on an annual basis. The Supervisor from North Hudson, do you believe that we should keep the location in North Hudson? Because I know that you draw more from Schroon Lake and that, can you tell whether that is viable for you all?

 

MOORE: If itís convenient, if you need a place on the southeast and thatís the best location, then Iím okay with it. I am for locating it wherever itís most convenient for our people to access and maybe that will encourage them to get out there and get rid of more of their stuff.

 

PALMER: Again, you know, we budget $40,000.00 as our share, just so weíre still under what we budget in terms of what we plan on spending and the State spends the rest in terms of 50%. I think what youíre really talking about is convenience for the individuals out there to get. I think you make it more convenient, people are more likely to do it. Thatís just how it works and I think if we decide and I you really should keep the four sites, I think and I think if we get out there and advertise earlier and more often than the likelihood is people will kind of circle that date and use it more often. So, again, youíre not, cutting down to a third site is not going to change your dollar amount. So, and it doesnít cost us more to open a 4th site. So, to me itís really a convenience thing and I would continue with the 4 sites.

 

JACKSON: Yeah, we donít make money on everything, somethings we lose money on and this is certainly one of them, but I think itís well worth it. I just wish we could kind of continue on what Daveís done and what Steve was talking about and if at the same time we could bring tires and e-waste and something to do with old refrigerators and freezers and stuff, that seems to be a problem thatís getting worse instead of better, we could combine, I donít know if we could combine them, theyíre separate, but the more of that stuff that we can get rid of, even if itís costing us money, itís better than having it put in the woods.

 

MORROW: Right

 

MOORE: It seems to me that when we talked about having the 4th site coming into Moriah we talked about rotating a site each year, too. I donít know if that would help or if these four sites are the optimal.

 

PALMER: Yeah, I donít know where you would rotate it to. I mean, honestly Ticonderoga, I mean Moriah seems to work, I mean unless we go to Ti. I mean thatís the other big center.

 

GIORDANO: I am not advocating for Ti, but I mean, I donít have a map in front of me, but if you look at those sites and you have North Elba, Eítown and Moriah, itís kind of right in the heart of the County and thereís about 6,000 people just in Chesterfield, Lewis, Willsboro and Essex and I donít know how many of those residents are utilizing this or if theyíre driving to Eítown? When you, at these different sites, I forget when I had gone to Moriah last year, if they ask for a zip code or if they ask of anything to just kind of pool in some information as to where these residents are coming from, but I donítknow if Minerva or Newcomb is being serviced as well.

 

PALMER: In terms of, we donít and honestly I wouldnít want to start checking where theyíre from, only because you know if you said, okay youíre not from Essex County turn around and go back, theyíre just going to go back and throw it over our bank somewhere, so thatís not going to help you much, you know from my point of view, if you can get your hands on that stuff and get it out of the systems youíre probably better off, itís not costing us more. Iíve got to tell you about the e-waste stuff, I am extremely frustrated about this and I think most people who have been in this business are. Thereís a New York State Law that says, if a manufacture sells a computer anywhere within your county, your boarders, they are required to recycle that used e-waste equipment and theyíre supposed to have a localized site that you can bring it to, the Walmarts, the big box stores, any of them are supposed to do that. Iíve never seen one, honestly. Other than the guy in Plattsburgh thatís willing to take the stuff, Iíve never seen an authorized e-waste site. Now, when that law was passed by the State we were specifically told, donít worry about it, this is not going to be a municipal function. Weíre not going to have to worry about it, people are going to be able to take their stuff back to these designated e-waste centers and you know, so your problems are taken care of, weíre from the State, weíve helped you all we can. Unfortunately, there is no site in Essex County, that I know of, where, thatís really the case. So, again the municipals are left struggling on their own as to how to deal with some of this stuff and it is frustrating, but I agree, e-waste is out there. We do it here at the County, we literally count on that guy in Plattsburgh, to be honest, we take our stuff, we store it in a trailer, when we have a full trailer we haul it to Plattsburgh and he takes it, but it is frustrating, the e-waste part, because the law doesnít mean anything, thereís nobody been forced to do anything.

 

MCNALLY: The DEC website, I read before, is supposed to have a place in every county.

 

PALMER: Yup, one designated, at least one designated spot.

 

MCNALLY: And also the life expectancy on these electronics is short.

 

PALMER: Two to three years.

 

MCNALLY: Four or five years, I mean this is going to an ongoing thing for the next, who knows, whatever. But, if that guy in Plattsburgh closes, weíre going to have a real problem and my second question is, thereís funding for the hazard waste, is there any funding available to offset the cost for e-waste?

 

PALMER: No, because the State has specifically said, donít worry about it, weíre going to make a designated spot, everybody is going to get to take their e-waste to this location. So, there is no grant money that Iím aware of that deals with e-waste.

 

MCNALLY: Because on our clean-up days weíre starting to find CDs over the bank.

 

PALMER: Oh yeah, you will.

 

MCNALLY: And right now I think the current cost, I think Newcomb uses it, but I think itís about .35Ę a pound.

 

PALMER: Yeah

 

MONTY: I think you also find that DEC has a system in place that we have to report every year on what we do with our e-waste, as well, because I just got the notice that my report was due, but we contract with a company that picks it up for .25Ę a pound, but the computer aspect with the screens, as long as they donít have CRT tubes are free. Our numbers, what I looked at in Lewis, are numbers have actually gone down, because there is less and less of the TVs being produced with those CRT tubes. Thereís less of those computer monitors being, using the CRT tube with it. So, actually our poundage that weíre being charged for is going down, the rest they pick up for nothing and stuff. It is working for us, so far, but again, itís .25Ę a pound for what you have to charge accordingly.

 

MORROW: Anybody else have anything on that? Would you like a resolution?

 

PALMER: Yeah, letís do that. Resolution to go with the four sites that we went with last year.

 

RESOLUTION SETTING THE DATES AND LOCATIONS FOR THE 2018 HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE DAYS.

Moved by Mr. Monty, seconded by Mr. Marnell.

 

MORROW: Any further discussion? All in favor? Opposed? Carries

 

MONTY: Can we throw into that a caveat that if Joe wants it, he can wrestle Tommy for it?

 

GIORDANO: No, Iím good

 

TYLER: Should there be some kind of a decision made to contact DEC, Wal-Mart or these places to maybe get this discussion going to open the site in Essex County?

 

PALMER: I can check into, Ike. Iíll look, Iíve got to tell you that everybody just kind of ignores it.

 

TYLER: Yeah

 

PALMER: I donít know

 

TYLER: I know we are going to have the meetings down in the city, maybe that would be a good time to talk to people, contact our legislators.

 

PALMER: Yeah, let me see if I can come up with something on it.

 

MONTY: If DEC, again, is recommending this, should we put pressure on DEC and say, okay where is it in Essex County?

 

MONTROY: Does Franklin County Solid Waste take the e-waste?

 

PALMER: They probably would. You would have to truck it, itís the trucking.

 

MONTROY: I live near there, so I go to Lake Clear dump and I see that they have a big pile of computers and TVs.

 

PALMER: They probably do. I wouldnít be surprised, they take most everything up there.

 

MORROW: Yeah, they do.

 

PALMER: So, it would just be a question of getting it there, I guess.

 

MONTROY: I mean like Lake Placid, all that waste goes to Lake Clear and then to Westville.

 

PALMER: Right

 

MORROW: At our transfer station we take e-waste and tires and everything, but they have to pay for it and then we get rid of it.

 

MONTROY: But, I know that they take that, so it might be an option for now.

 

MORROW: Mine go to Lewis. Anything else, Jim?

 

DOUGAN: Yup, just one other item. Last month we awarded the water meter materials for at the Public Safety Building, something that weíve been working at for a little while. Mr. Monty told the Board a year or so ago that if we got a water meter installed, he would work on the rate with us and so he came into the office a couple of weeks ago and explained what he would do, now that he knows that weíre moving forward with that. So, the Town of Lewis is going to start billing the County quarterly, rather than semi-annually and the way that works in their water rate schedule is every 100,000 gallons of water gets $250.00 more expensive. So, in a 6 month period we typically use 1.4 million gallons of water, so you can imagine those gallons that are up around a million or 1.2 million are a lot more expensive than the ones that are at 500,000 or 600,000, so based on the water that we used last year and making this change, Iím projecting $21,750.00 worth of savings for the County by him allowing us to do that. So, I will get the water meter installed in the few months and you said youíd let us start doing this, right away in 2018.

 

MONTY: The next billing cycle

 

DOUGAN: Just so you know, the water meter materials were almost $24,000.00, so weíll get most of that back in the first year.

 

PALMER: And I just want to thank Jim, because this is the first Supervisor from Lewis thatís actually said, okay weíll work with you in terms of the billing, because the water billing is pretty expensive down there and I appreciate the effort and it does make a difference.

 

MONTY: It took me a few years to get over sting of the initial issues that were there.

 

PALMER: Yeah

 

MONTY: But, Iíve gotten over them, but I think my taxpayers in Lewis are also County taxpayers and itís a benefit of all.

 

PALMER: We appreciate it.

 

MORROW: I really would like to thank, also, like Dan, Iíd like to thank Jim and his Town Board, because this is has been an issue thatís been going on, even when I was Public Safety Chair, when we built the building down there, and I went to many of your meetings and remember and finally being done, thank you very much on behalf of the County taxpayers and everybody, thank you Jim.

 

MONTY: Youíre welcome.

 

MORROW: I am sure somebody wonít be happy to hear that. Iíll hear about it tomorrow.

Anything else, Jim?

 

DOUGAN: Thatís all I have.

 

MORROW: Okay, thank you very much.

 

DOUGAN: Thank you

 

 

*********************

 

††††††††††† The next item on the agenda was Soil and Water with Dave Reckahn having been previously excused.

 

RECKAHN: Good morning, sorry thereís not a report in there. Weíve had some issues with our email and I thought Iíd gotten it. I should have known when Judy didnít respond, sheís so good at responding when I send in my reports.

Just a couple of things to highlight with the report is that weíre doing a lot of work right now with the agricultural community, with the agricultural exemptions for farms and trying to get that in for your tax rolls and weíre also working on some grants for land owners, one of them right now is climate resilient grants for these farmers that want to be more climate resilient and doing projects that try and manage the water on to the landscape of the farm, utilizing it for irrigation, but then what it does is it holds that water onto the landscape on the farm and then it allows less water during a storm event to come down into your stream. So, itís a real benefit to both the farm to make them more resilient for these drought periods, but it also helps you and your communities to help you be more flood resilient, because it holds that water on to the landscape on these farms, so hopefully weíll get some more funding for some additional projects for that.

The other thing is, I donít want belabor it, but in the discussions about the landfill and the waste and the hazardous waste. A couple of things that I would just offer is, that one of the things that I had at our water quality coordinating committee is that they have offered to, they love that program, they would like to see it continue and some of the lake associations would really like to make sure and I need to try and make sure to do this too, is that I see it on there, some people feels like itís just one of the reasons why I maybe goes up and down a little bit, is that sometimes it doesnít get out there enough to the people. So, I will try and make sure it gets out to our Water Quality Coordinating Committee and people know when those clean ups are or those pick-ups are and weíll try and get it out. in our discussions or our work that weíve had, I know that it was mentioned about the tire collection and weíre looking at that and the other thing weíre actually looking at is trying to utilize those tires for a use and weíve come up with, weíre trying to look at the idea, when the project was done on Hulls Falls Road, the contractor there, in order to work around the stream and the wetlands, actually used mats that they could work through the wetlands were made of tires. So, weíre looking at maybe we can try and do some mats that the highway crews or the construction companies can borrow from the district that would be made out the tires that we have, so we donít have to take them into the collection. The interesting thing is, just to let you know what we ran into, is that collecting tires is not a fun job. First, we found out that DEC now, if we go over a 1,000 tires in our collection we have to have a permit. We found out that getting rid of the tires is not an easy process, we were trying to utilize them and trying to send them up to Canada and they had a lot of troubles in using them in their processes up there to where we were held back on when we could have to collections, on how much we could give them and weíre still not sure that they got rid of all the tires that we gave them this fall, so thereís a lot of issues.

And the last thing is, weíll try and work on the tires, but Iíll also try and try to work together with Dan and Iíd like to find out if we can help out at all with the e-waste and if thereís some way we could coordinate that along with the hazardous waste. So, we will try to help do that. I do think that is a high priority, as I said, with our Water Quality Coordinating Committees.

And the last thing I have is for you, as your towns, Iíll try to get this information out to you and get it out to your highway superintendents, but we do have the new program for the rural roads active management program and weíre going to have up to $7,500.00 eligible for the projects for roadside erosion on your small back roads, especially the dirt roads that are causing troubles or going in and recrowning the roads, so the water runs off properly and doesnít end washing the road back down into the stream and these types of projects and we will have those available. There will also be some additional money, if the town wants to go through and do some sort of roadside inventory to figure out what these rural roads needs to be addressed and there is some planning dollars for up to $3,750.00 for each project. So, I will get those applications out to you, you can pass them on to your highway superintendents, some of them I will try and get them directly to the highway superintendents. So, hopefully weíll see some good projects out of this and thatís it.

 

TYLER: Really quick, Dave, weíre having, I just came from a meeting before I came here and weíre scheduling a clean-up thing in Westport for Earth Day and maybe, if it is reasonable, we could work out where you could do another collection at the weekend that weíre doing that.

 

RECKAHN: Okay, yup, great

 

MARNELL: Dave, if you, the State has considered classifying materials, demolition, excavating, everything you have to pay for a building to be solid waste, thatís already happening in New York, so they have pictures of all, a couple of different town garages, because everybodyís got a waste dump or a stump dump or when youíre excavating. Weíre going to have to fight that, because if that comes into effect that could be a big expense for the towns.

 

RECKAHN: And itís not only the hazardous part of it, too, now what weíre running into is thereís concerns over the seeds and the evasive species that in these areas and thatís what we have to, kind of, there is a practices to work with, so thatís why weíve been having APEP, trying to work closely with the highway departments. But, certainly, yes, making too hazardous waste is just going to make to one step further to make it where youíre almost going to have to landfill that; which, right now thatís actually a great resource, because we have a, area to when a lot of your roadsides are very, very poor soils, and so itís hard to get grasses to go to stabilize these areas and I know that the County does a great job of trying to put together with those ditch cleanings and with those, you know, mixing in a little bit of topsoil, a little bit of manure and making it a good topsoil out of it, so that you have something really good to stabilize these roadsides and one of the things that theyíre finding out is that one of the ways to stop erosion is to have a really good composted soil on there. In fact the new DEC standards for erosion sediment control is that good topsoil is one of the big requirements on a construction site to keep from having erosion, so those ditch cleanings, hopefully will not be managed as hazardous because theyíre something that we can use to help with that mix to make topsoil.

 

MORROW: Anybody else have anything for Dave?

 

MONTROY: Do you know when the applications, do you have any applications for the funding for the rural roads?

 

RECKAHN: Yes, I do and I will make sure that they will go out to the highway superintendents that I have emails to and the ones that I donít, Iíll make sure that all the Town Supervisors are going to get an email copy of the final. We just came out with the final application this week, so Iíll make sure that you guys get copies of the final applications.

 

MORROW: Okay, anybody else?

 

MARNELL: Town Topics, which is magazine that was in the last part of Town Topics magazine, it is in the works.

 

RECKAHN: Okay

 

MORROW: Dave are you all set?

 

RECKAHN: Yeah, Iím all set

 

MORROW: Okay, if there is nothing more, we stand adjourned.

 

 

 

AS THERE WAS NO FURTHER BUSINESS TO COME BEFORE THIS DPW COMMITTEE, IT WAS ADJOURNED AT 10:15 AM.

 

 

Respectively Submitted,

 

 

 

Judith Garrison, Clerk

Board of Supervisors